FAQS

What should I look for when buying a fur piece (new/used)?

  • The pelt should be lustrous, supple and well-matched.
  • Feel the fur for a dense, soft underfur evident to the touch under the glossy guard hairs which should be soft, never bristly.
  • Seams should be sewn tightly. Hems should fall straight.
  • Be sure to try on the garment to see if the weight is comfortable for you. You may be surprised at how lightweight many fur coats actually are.
  • A well-made fur will be well-balanced and will fall evenly and comfortably from your shoulders.
  • There should be a give to the leather side of the fur when horizontal tension is applied.

What kind of fur is my coat made out of?

Your best bet is to take your coat to a local fur retailer to evaluate your fur garment. Call us on 020 7427 6090 or send us an email to contact@thaliafurs.co.uk and we will book a date for you to come in and have your fur evaluated.

How much is my fur piece worth?

Take your fur into your local furrier for an evaluation. You can also call us on 020 7427 6090 or send us an email to contact@thaliafurs.co.uk and we will book a date for you to come in and have your fur evaluated free of charge.

What should I do with my old fur?

Many people opt to restyle their fur, sell their fur or donate their fur to a local charity.

How do I go about restyling my fur?

From minor changes to an absolute revamping of your fur piece, a master furrier will walk you through all your restyling options. Because of the durability of fur, the growing trend is for many young women to snatch up their mother’s and grandmother’s hand-me-downs and use their creativity to transform them into styles that accommodate their modern lifestyles. Click here for more information.

You can also call us on 020 7427 6090 or send us an email to contact@thaliafurs.co.uk and we will book a date for you to come in and have a free consultation with one of our head furriers.

How should I go about selling my fur?

Contact your local furrier to inquire whether they purchase used coats. If they do not purchase used coats they will be happy to direct you to someone who does. In the past several years fur has become a particularly strong item for vintage clothing stores and they will often pay handsomely for your used fur. Another option is auctioning the coat on-line with a service such as E-bay. You will find a wide array of quality used and vintage furs for sale on-line.

We also do buy vintage fur from time to time. Fell free to call us on 020 7427 6090 or send us an email to contact@thaliafurs.co.uk and we will book a date for you to come in and have your fur evaluated at our main workshop free of charge.

Where can I donate my fur?

We recommend that you contact your local furrier, as most local furriers have donation programs with community based charities.

Why do I need to put my fur in cold storage, isn’t my closet good enough?

Home storage, using air conditioning or a cedar closet will not protect your fur from insect damage, drying out, becoming dirty or oxidising which can discolour fur or change its texture.” Fur vaults specifically designed to protect the lasting quality of a fur garment offer temperature, humidity and light-controlled environments. Air exchange is carefully regulated with temperatures kept below 10 degrees Celsius and a constant humidity level of 50%. No closet in your home can duplicate these conditions adequately.

For more detailed information visit www.furcare.org

How have sales fared in recent years?

The UK government banned fur farming in Britain in 2003 but it can still be imported from other countries. Despite the ban, the fur trade is worth up to £500m a year to the UK, according to the British Fur Trade Association (BFTA).

Mink and fox are among the most popular furs in the UK.

But in recent years fur has started to increase in popularity. Furriers have reported a surge in sales in the past year, with fur reappearing on fashion show runways.

The BFTA says its sales have risen by a third in the past year and the International Fur Trade Federation (IFTF) says global sales have increased from $9.1bn (£5bn) in 2000 to $11.7bn (£6.6bn) last year.

Both support Cites and say they do not handle or deal in endangered species.

The US fur trade has been valued at more than $1.50 billion for 2014 – a 7.3% increase over 2013. If fur, fur trim and accessories sales through designer and fashion boutiques, ski/sporting goods boutiques, luxury shoe stores, department stores and online retail sites are factored in total fur sales would be substantially higher.
In contrast, according to the Worldwide Luxury Goods Market Study conducted by Bain & Company, U.S. sales of personal luxury goods, the “core of the core” of luxury, grew at just 5% in 2014 (at constant exchange rates).
According to Editd, a trendspotting service that tracks retail fashion data, the number of fur outerwear products in stores (including faux fur and shearling) jumped by 74% in November 2014 vs, November 2013.

To what do you attribute this strong consumer demand?

Innovations in design and manufacturing have allowed designers to use fur in more creative ways than ever before. New techniques in dying, laser cutting and micro-shearing, embellishment and other treatments have allowed the creation of a much broader range of silhouettes and products that appeal to a much broader range of consumers. Add to that the fact that fur is seen in so many more retail outlets and supported by such strong fashion editorial.

Why is fur in fashion now?

Innovations in fur manufacturing and design have made fur the “fabric” of choice among over 500 designers world wide. New techniques of shearing, dying, knitting and integrating fur with other fabrics have allowed designers to use fur more creatively, adapting its use to high fashion ranging from glamorous evening wear to street chic. Manufacturing innovations that allow fur to be much lighter in weight (though just as warm as before) have added to its design flexibility. This new creativity coupled with the unique, tactile benefits of fur and its luxury appeal make it the ultimate fabric for adding a dash of luxury and spirit to any collection.

Where can I take a class on fur design & manufacturing?

Many design schools include fur manufacturing & design as one segment of study within their design curriculum. Additionally, fur retailers have artisans on staff who are often willing to provide training and education.

Historically, what has been the most popular fur (men/women)?

Historically, mink has maintained its popularity among both men and women.

The animal rights movement continues to target the fur industry. Haven’t they been responsible for the previous declines in fur sales?

According to research done by Responsive Management, a public opinion research firm specialising in environmental conservation and wildlife issues in the US, 88% of all Americans say that the animal rights movement had no influence on their decision to buy (or not buy) fur. In fact, 92% said they disapprove of the tactics used by animal activists. The recession of 1987 through the early 90’s was the primary reason for the decline in fur sales.

How do you respond to those who say wearing fur is wrong?

What one chooses to wear is a matter of personal choice. We respect the decision of those who choose not to wear fur just as we respect the decision of those who choose not to eat meat. But if a person chooses to wear fur, or eat meat, they should be able to do so free of harassment. When consumers consider the truth about the fur industry they will recognise that the fur is a natural, responsible choice.

Various animal rights groups routinely distribute graphic videos of animals being tortured or living in horrifying conditions. Have you seen these videos?

Yes, we’ve seen them. In many cases members of our industry have asked for verification of authenticity on these tapes and never received it. And, in fact, in some cases it has been proven that the footage was staged in order to create these films.

The UK government banned fur farming in Britain in 2003 but it can still be imported from other countries. All our products are based on 100% real fur and sourced from countries where national or local regulations and standards governing fur production are in force.

With so many good fake furs out there why should the consumer choose real fur?

Imitation is the greatest form of flattery. The proliferation of fake fur only proves the point that fur is in fashion!  But, no matter how good the fake, it will never have the warmth, the feel or the durability of real fur.

In today’s environmentally conscious society, consumers should also recognise that the manufacture of fake fur utilises non-renewable petroleum-based resources.  Real fur, on the other hand, may be considered the “green” alternative as it is a renewable, sustainable resource.  In fact, it should be noted that the populations of  animals used by the fur industry today are as abundant – or more abundant – than a century ago.

Further, in a study titled “Environmental Consequences of Textile Marketing” undertaken at Oregon State University in 1997 a broad range of textiles including wool, leather, fur, cotton, silk, linen, rayon, polyester, nylon and acrylic were evaluated across a number of environmental variables. For a textile to be considered compatible with the environment it had to be non-polluting to obtain, process, fabricate, maintain and dispose; 100% biodegradable; long-lasting; renewable; reusable; natural/non-toxic; energy efficient to obtain and produce and producing minimal waste in it’s production. In composite scoring across all environmental criteria, the farmed and wild fur outperformed all other textiles. So, one must ask, is fake fur really preferable?

Animal rights supporters suggest that fur is just a vanity item. Don’t most people wear fur just to show off?

No. The number one reason given by consumers when asked why they purchased their fur is warmth.

How can you justify the horrible conditions that exist for animals on farms?

Do not be misled by some of the false propaganda and fabricated materials presented by animal rights activists. However, it is important to note that animal cruelty does exist in the fur trade like any other animal related industry. We source all our furs from countries where national or local regulations and standards governing fur production are in force. The respect these farmers have for their animals and land is well documented and today’s farm-raised furbearers are among the best cared-for livestock. Good nutrition, comfortable housing and prompt veterinary care have resulted in animals very well suited to the farm environment. Only the healthiest and best cared for animals produce the finest pelts, and it is precise attention to animal care and strict adherence to animal husbandry guidelines and recommendations that enable farmers to produce the quality fur that is demanded in today’s marketplace.

Does the fur industry use endangered species?

The international fur trade does not trade in endangered species and all furs used by the trade are abundant. We do not import any fur from endangered animals and doing so is also illegal in the UK.

The fur trade’s commitment to conservation is shown by the fact that when there has been doubt that sustained yields can be maintained, it has financed research to investigate the position. In fact, since 1978, IFTF has contributed more than £3 million in support of a wide range of fur animal welfare and conservation projects. The fur trade has supported any resulting recommendations to regulate or restrict trade, if based upon sound scientific evidence.

In the early 1970’s prior to the introduction of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), the international fur trade imposed its own voluntary moratorium on trade in leopard and other species pending the outcome of scientific research into their status. Since then, IFTF has helped to finance a number of important research projects into the population status of various fur-bearers.

The International Fur Trade Federation has a close working relationship with leading conservation organisations including the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which acts to regulate commercial trade in threatened or endangered species, and the World Conservation Union (IUCN). IFTF has been a voting member of the latter since 1985.

The international fur trade does not trade in endangered species and all furs used by the trade are abundant.

The fur trade’s commitment to conservation is shown by the fact that when there has been doubt that sustained yields can be maintained, it has financed research to investigate the position. In fact, since 1978, IFTF has contributed more than US$ 5 million in support of a wide range of fur animal welfare and conservation projects. The fur trade has supported any resulting recommendations to regulate or restrict trade, if based upon sound scientific evidence.

In the early 1970’s prior to the introduction of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), the international fur trade imposed its own voluntary moratorium on trade in leopard and other species pending the outcome of scientific research into their status. Since then, IFTF has helped to finance a number of important research projects into the population status of various fur-bearers.

The International Fur Trade Federation has a close working relationship with leading conservation organizations including the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which acts to regulate commercial trade in threatened or endangered species, and the World Conservation Union (IUCN). IFTF has been a voting member of the latter since 1985.